Do the right thing!

A student just came rushing to my office and handed me an assignment (part of a final project) which he thought was due today. I gave the assignment and set the deadline as today but I did not take the assignment in. The purpose of doing this is so that the students do their work in increments rather than leave it all until the last minute and hand in sloppy work.

As the student handed me the assignment, I informed him that he was not required to hand it in. I could see the frustration in his face as he asked me why I had told them it was due today. I replied, “So that you would have it done by today.” I then asked him an obvious question; “Did you do it?” “Yes”,  he replied. To which I responded; “Then we have met our objective.”
Even as the student walked away, I could tell he was still disgruntled that he had spent time doing his school work under the impression that it was due to be handed in and then found out that it was not going to be handed in. Just as I thought he had left, he reappeared and asked me to give him feed-back and I told him that I was happy to but not at the present moment. I encouraged him to come to my office during “office hours” and I let him know I would be happy to assist him. He was still clearly disgruntled as he walked away from my office.

The reason why I am sharing this experience is that I have noticed that a lot of students don’t really come to college to learn. They seem to come to college as a means to an end and in my observation, while most of them are here, they do almost everything that they can to avoid learning!

The student that I just described did the assignment as part of his learning process but did not assign any value to the learning. Instead, he was frustrated that he had done the assignment “for nothing”. This is what I take issue with. It seems that college has become a means to an end and learning has become an “inconvenience” along the way. I genuinely believe that this line of thinking is not much different from people who serve others only because they expect something in return or so as to “be seen” serving which will improve their public image.

I’m glad this student came by my office because he made me think about a very important lesson that I leaned a long time ago: Do the right things for the right reasons.

It’s quite possible to do the “right thing” (like philanthropy) and still be wrong because we are doing the right thing for the wrong reason (like boosting public image). It is also possible to do the “wrong thing” (like say “no” to someone you care about) but have good intention (like preserving your time and energy for more important tasks).

The best students that I have come across are the ones who come to college to learn, gather information and improve their skills so that they can reach their career goals and make a positive impact in their communities. These students are the ones who are doing the right thing (getting an education) for the right reasons (improving their lives and those of other people).

The next time you have a task in from of you; ask yourself if you’re doing the right thing and if you’re doing it for the right reason. Failing which, if you’re going to do something that may be perceived as the “wrong” thing; do it for the right reason!

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4 Responses to “Do the right thing!”

  1. […] the rest at successfulblackwoman.com Subscribe to this author’s posts feed via RSS About nomalangaNomalanga is a professional […]

  2. Je'Nai says:

    I read this excerpt this morning and didn’t experience an unfamiliar conviction, until I read the fifth paragraph. Even though I agree with the earlier qualms the author presented (concerning student), I believe there is a greater challenge to those in student services and Higher Education. The statement in the fifth paragraph raises a point we all must peer into. Nomalanga states, “I genuinely believe that this line of thinking is not much different from people who serve others only because they expect something in return or so as to “be seen” serving which will improve their public image”.

    I am one who strives to not be involved in activities, conversation, or relationships for selfish reasons. Even though at times we can all be selfish. I think it is always great to do an inward inspection. This allows us to review why we maintain certain schools of thoughts and ideals that provide the inertia for motives and external actions others view. Another Johari’s window moment!

    As those in Higher Education assess our purpose for our roles in education, it will be easier to challenge those we are sent to teach. This article is very befitting as Faculty and Student Affairs practictioners across the nation prepare to close the academic year.

    I thank the author so much for sharing her thoughts.

    Shalom,

    Je’Nai

  3. […] lesson that I leaned a long time ago: Do the right things for the right reasons.Read the rest at successfulblackwoman.com Nomalanga Mhlauli-Moses is a wife, mother, professional speaker and an Assistant Professor of […]

  4. Lourdes Vodicka says:

    Just wanted to stop by and say thanks. Enjoy reading your stuff.

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