The Trayvon Martin case: We have work to do

By Nomalanga Mhlauli-Moses

Ever since I heard about Trayvon Martin, the teenage boy who was brutally murdered by an over- zealous neighborhood watchman, George Zimmerman, I’ve been thinking a lot about why I was so emotionally impacted by the murder. I’ve realized that it means so much to me because a little over three years ago, I gave birth to the most adorable baby boy that I have ever known, my son.

Ever since the birth of my son, who is my second child, I have had to think about something that I never really used to give much consideration. I have had to think about what it means to grow up as a black boy in America. My husband, who was born and raised in America (I was born and raised in Botswana), has shared many stories of how he has experienced being assumed to be “dumb” in school, mainly because he was black and some stories about how he was assumed to be the aggressor in any conflict, again because he was Black. In spite of him having shared his experiences with me, the fact that he is now a grown man who has made tremendous advances in his career and his life goals, made his stories a little less real to me or at least not something that I had a great deal of concern about.

When I heard about Trayvon Martin, I had a moment where I wept uncontrollably and I realize that what has changed about me is that I am now a mother-I am Trayvon’s mother. My Trayvon is still only three years old and he goes by a different name that his father and I gave him but he is a sweet boy who we love very much and he does not deserve to be shot to death.

Read the rest here.


Nomalanga Mhlauli-Moses is a wife, mother, professional speaker and an Assistant Professor of Professional Studies. For more information about Nomalanga’s programs, please click here.

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One Response to “The Trayvon Martin case: We have work to do”

  1. Anne Roberts says:

    I am the grandmother of a young man who will be 17 in 3 days, the same age as Trayvon Martin at the time he was murdered. It affected me deeply, and continues to do so, because George Zimmerman and his defenders have been smearing this kid’s name. That’s because they don’t have a legitimate defense for why he accosted this young man after being instructed not to, and causing his needless death. It’s because he was a wannabe cop who was rejected in his own attempts at becoming a law enforcement officer. He has gotten away with a lot of scrapes with the law, receiving preferential treatment because of his father’s former position as a Virginia magistrate and his father’s connection with a former State Attorney who helped him to almost get away with this crime.

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